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Table of Contents

Book
Introduction

Managing
Security

Outsourcing
Options

Reserving
Rights

Determining
Identity

Preserving
Privacy

Connecting
Networks

Hardening
Networks

Storing
Information

Hiding
Information

Accessing
Information

Ensuring
Availability

Detecting
Intrusions

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Logging and
Analysis
Chapter List
File Integrity
Viruses and Trojans
Network Scanners
Network Sniffers
Logging and Analysis
Computer Forensics (web bonus)
More Information
Resources (links)
Discussions
FAQs
Errata
Sample Pages
Buy The Book
at amazon.com
Logging could be the most boring concept ever. It’s fundamentally wasteful—billions of bytes of data are put into digital filing cabinets, never to see the light of a monitor.
You know that guy who keeps a spare copy of every receipt organized alphabetically in a file? That guy is a logger. His friends? Meet Bobby Paperclip, Johnny the Stapler, Sara Hole Punch, Frank File Cabinet, and Steve Super Glue. Who wants to be a logger?

Boring or not, logging is the most important concept in intrusion detection and recovery. Without logs, the only way to know about a problem is to observe it happening
(or it’s aftermath). Logging can be used to:
  • Make sure things are going smoothly, according to routine.
  • Figure out what went wrong.
  • Determine performance, effectiveness, and so on.
  • Hold individuals accountable for actions.
  • Build historical records that can be useful during audits.
Once you start logging, you’ll begin to realize that logs are very valuable and useful in many situations. You’re might even want to start logging right away. That’s a great idea, but try not to get too friendly with the office supplies.

More Information

The above information is the start of a chapter in "Network Security Illustrated," published by McGraw-Hill and available from amazon.com, as well as your local bookstore. The book goes into much greater depth on this topic. To learn more about the book and what it covers, click here.

Below, you'll find links to online resources that supplement this portion of the book.


Resources

(websites, books, etc.)

Discussions

FAQs

Errata

Sample Pages