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Table of Contents

Book
Introduction

Managing
Security

Outsourcing
Options

Reserving
Rights

Determining
Identity

Preserving
Privacy

Connecting
Networks

Hardening
Networks

Storing
Information

Hiding
Information

Accessing
Information

Ensuring
Availability

Detecting
Intrusions

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Backup
Systems
Chapter List
RAID
Clustering
Backup Systems
Distributed Computing (web bonus)
Rollout Systems (web bonus)
More Information
Resources (links)
Discussions
FAQs
Errata
Sample Pages
Buy The Book
at amazon.com
Security is as much about getting back on your feet after a disaster as it is about preventing a disaster. It is ironic, actually, because recovery is rarely associated with security.
Think of a backup system being the direct equivalent to a good homeowner’s insurance policy. One can never really tell how good insurance is until he or she needs to use it in an emergency. Once a home has been robbed, however, insurance is actually put to the test. How quickly does your agent answer you phone calls? How fast is an appraiser sent out to your home to assess the situation? Most importantly,
how quickly do you get made whole again? An insurance policy may look great on paper, like not having expensive monthly payments, but when the time comes to get back on your feet if the carrier’s response is not quick and straightforward you will find yourself in an unfortunate situation.

Modern data backup systems, much like insurance policies, cannot be truly evaluated until restoration is needed. Of course, no business wants to be in a position that requires restoration. To complicate matters even more, many choices are available to an organization that needs backup solutions. It is a forgone conclusion that testing all of the available backup systems will not be an option. Instead, achieving a
firm grasp on the different backup systems available is the best a company can hope to accomplish. With the proper knowledge, the appropriate backup system to match any security philosophy can be obtained and tested.

What people think: We have installed our Redundant Array of
Inexpensive Disks (RAID) and cluster systems, so we no longer need traditional methods of backup.

What we think: Security is as much about recovery as it is about prevention and the only chance for clean recovery is good solid backup.

More Information

The above information is the start of a chapter in "Network Security Illustrated," published by McGraw-Hill and available from amazon.com, as well as your local bookstore. The book goes into much greater depth on this topic. To learn more about the book and what it covers, click here.

Below, you'll find links to online resources that supplement this portion of the book.


Resources

(websites, books, etc.)

Discussions

FAQs

Errata

Sample Pages