Network Security Illustrated buy the book at Amazon now!


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Table of Contents

Book
Introduction

Managing
Security

Outsourcing
Options

Reserving
Rights

Determining
Identity

Preserving
Privacy

Connecting
Networks

Hardening
Networks

Storing
Information

Hiding
Information

Accessing
Information

Ensuring
Availability

Detecting
Intrusions

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Spam
Management
Chapter List
Anonymity
User Tracking
Spam Management
More Information
Resources (links)
Discussions
FAQs
Errata
Sample Pages
Buy The Book
at amazon.com

Jerry Seinfeld once asked,”What is mail, really?” His punch line was that mail boils down to two things: bills and junk mail. Why get excited about mail? It is not as if anybody actually sends you anything interesting like letters anymore. Sadly, traditional mail, or snail mail, is mostly a lost art. A typical trip to one’s mailbox reveals nothing besides bills and solicitations. There is little reason to send letters through
the postal system when they can be sent for free over the Internet and reach their destination almost instantly.

Email has taken over snail mail as a routine form of written correspondence. As the medium has grown in popularity it caught the attention of the snail mail solicitors. Now digital junk mail, known as spam, has followed the paper letter writers to their new medium. The result is that the average person’s daily email contains 10 credit card offers, 8 young girls who show it all, 15 guaranteed ways to make up to $1,723 per week from home, and 3 herbal solutions for impotency.

More Information

The above information is the start of a chapter in "Network Security Illustrated," published by McGraw-Hill and available from amazon.com, as well as your local bookstore. The book goes into much greater depth on this topic. To learn more about the book and what it covers, click here.

Below, you'll find links to online resources that supplement this portion of the book.


Resources

(websites, books, etc.)

Discussions

FAQs

Errata

Sample Pages